Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly
2160 Fin Unit
Saturn V Poster

Saturn V (1:200 scale) Ready to Fly

Sku: 002160
$76.99
Sale
Beginner

The 2160 Saturn V rocket comes almost ready to fly out of the box and includes a display stand to celebrate the historic 50th anniversary of the moon landing!

Overview

The Estes limited production and commemorative 1:200 scale Apollo II Saturn V model is almost 2 feet tall and comes fully assembled with many scale details and markings carefully reproduced for exceptional realism. This historical model of the Saturn V is suitable for display and celebrates the historic 50th anniversary of landing the first man on the moon!

Ready to fly rocket is almost 2 feet tall!
Completely assembled with scale details, painting and markings.
Includes colorful, pre-assembled 18” parachute for recovery.
Saturn V display stand included.
A Truly Historic Rocket!
As the tallest, heaviest and most powerful rocket ever produced, the original Saturn V was a 3-stage rocket that stood 363 feet high (110.6m), weighed approximately 6.2 million pounds and generated 7.6 million pounds of thrust at lift off. At just over 36 stories tall, it stood about 60 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty, making it quite an impressive site on the launch pad.

The Saturn V was at the heart of NASA’s Apollo and Skylab programs as it was able to launch a 45-ton payload beyond low earth orbit, which was necessary for sending men to the moon. A total of 13 Saturn V launches took place between 1967 and 1973, delivering 24 astronauts successfully to the moon and back to earth. The first launch of the Saturn V rocket was during the Apollo 4 mission of 1967, and was a crew-less launch meant to test the rocket. The first launch with a crew occurred in December of 1968 during the Apollo 8 mission which sent astronauts in orbit around the moon but did not land. Apollo 9 added another piece to the puzzle as the moon lander was tested by flying in Earth's orbit, and Apollo 10 saw the lander launch to the moon, testing its space flight again without landing. Then came Apollo 11 in 1969, changing the space race forever!

We were finally able to land astronauts on the moon and take that famous first step into the future. Successful missions followed with the Saturn V rocket, landing astronauts on the moon during Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17. The last launch of this historic rocket came in 1973 when it was used to launch the Skylab space station into Earth orbit.

Need more reason to buy?
Look inside your Saturn V box for a special free poster offer from Estes! We will send you this beautiful Saturn V poster at no cost to you!
Created by Aldo Spadoni, this limited edition, 10" x 30" poster will brighten up any space! Get yours while supplies last!

This scale model rocket looks great as a decorative piece, mounted to the included display stand, and can also be launched! To launch, simply attach the included clear fin unit, and hit the launch pad with a C6-3 engine!

What You Need to Fly

Estes Porta-Pad II Launch Pad and Electron Beam Launch Controller, Estes model rocket engines, starters and recovery wadding.
Four 1.5V high quality AA alkaline batteries (sold separately)

Technical Specifications

  • Recommended Engines

C5-3, C6-3
  • Launch System

Porta-Pad II
  • Projected Max Altitude

200 ft. (61 m)
  • Recovery System

18 in. (45.7 cm) Parachute
  • Length

21.8 in. (55.4 cm)
  • Diameter

1.98 in. (50 mm)
  • Weight

5 oz. (141.7 g)
  • Fin Material

Molded Plastic

Needed to Build (sold separately)

Pre-Built and Assembled
This product recommended for children ages 10+ with adult supervision for those under 12, and rocketeers of all ages.

Customer Reviews

Based on 15 reviews
80%
(12)
13%
(2)
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7%
(1)
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J
Jack
Much larger than it looks in the picture! The display

Much larger than it looks in the picture! The display is awesome beautiful displayed with the SLS model!!!

M
Michael Guerra
The old 1/100 scale model in the 1969 catalog was

The old 1/100 scale model in the 1969 catalog was $9.95. There is a new 1/100 model from another manufacturer now selling for $300.00 plus! Makes the $80.00 for this one seem reasonable

B
Bill Rhinehart
I bought mine many years ago. It took a long

I bought mine many years ago. It took a long time to build but when I flew it it was a majestic sight it Was all cardboard and some balsa and i Remember putting is together in our kitchen.
I love it. it's the most impressive Thing i've ever flown. If I remember I flew it with a "D" engine. If you are a NASA fan or a rocket fan the display is awesome.